Proteins – the indispensable building blocks of our bodies

Alongside fats and carbohydrates, protein is one of the most important macronutrients for our bodies. For example, it is essential for our muscles and our immune systems. In our products, we only use proteins from particularly high-quality, vegetarian sources – and we make sure that our products have an optimal amino acid profile.

The five most important functions of proteins:

  1. They strengthen our immune systems
  2. They help with tendon, ligament and cartilage tissue development
  3. They support muscle development
  4. They accelerate muscle regeneration
  5. They regulate our hormone levels

What are proteins?

Proteins are complex amino acid structures that play an essential role in the human body. They are key components in our cells and are vital for the structure, function and regulation of our tissue and organs. This makes them an important building block of our bones, muscles, cartilage tissue, skin and blood. However, our bodies don’t just use proteins to build or repair tissue, but also to create enzymes, hormones and other chemicals in the body.

Proteins are comprised of amino acids that are connected in long chains. There are 20 different kinds of amino acids that can be combined to create a protein. The amino acid sequence determines the unique three-dimensional structure of each protein along with its specific function. Amino acids are divided into essential and non-essential amino acids.

The 12 non-essential amino acids can be synthesised by an organism on its own, whereas an organism must have the eight essential amino acids supplied external sources – such as from their diet.

As opposed to fat and carbohydrates, our bodies do not store proteins in their original form, but rather in the form of muscle mass. As a result, we only have a limited protein reserve that can be accessed when we do not receive sufficient amounts (both of protein and carbohydrates). Moreover, this leads to a loss of muscle mass.

Proteins fulfil key functions in our bodies.

Developing and maintaining the body’s structure

Protein offers structure and support for cells. On a larger scale, they support muscle development and thus give our bodies shape, strength and allow them to move.

Transport and storage

Proteins bind and transport atoms and small molecules in cells and throughout the entire body.

Formation of antibodies

Proteins help us form antibodies. These bind certain foreign bodies such as viruses and bacteria in order to protect our bodies.

Formation of enzymes

Enzymes are responsible for carrying out nearly every chemical reaction that takes place in our cells. They also help with the formation of new molecules by reading the stored genetic information in our DNA.

Coordination of biological processes

Like certain hormones, some proteins transmit signals to coordinate biological processes between different cells, tissues and organs.

How much protein do I need every day?

Our body needs a certain amount of protein every day in order to function properly. In order to reach optimal health and fitness levels, we recommend having a specialist determine your individual protein needs.

Here are the general reference values per day:

  • Teenage boys and active adult men: 150 to 200 grams
  • Children ages two to six, adult women and seniors: 100 to 140 grams
  • Children age six and older, teenage girls, active adult women and most adult men: 120 to 170 grams
  • Muscle development in women and men: 1.3 to 1.5 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight

Proteins – the indispensable building blocks of our bodies

Alongside fats and carbohydrates, protein is one of the most important macronutrients for our bodies. For example, it is essential for our muscles and our immune systems. In our products, we only use proteins from particularly high-quality, vegetarian sources – and we make sure that our products have an optimal amino acid profile.

The five most important functions of proteins:

  1. They strengthen our immune systems
  2. They help with tendon, ligament and cartilage tissue development
  3. They support muscle development
  4. They accelerate muscle regeneration
  5. They regulate our hormone levels

What are proteins?

Proteins are complex amino acid structures that play an essential role in the human body. They are key components in our cells and are vital for the structure, function and regulation of our tissue and organs. This makes them an important building block of our bones, muscles, cartilage tissue, skin and blood. However, our bodies don’t just use proteins to build or repair tissue, but also to create enzymes, hormones and other chemicals in the body.

Proteins are comprised of amino acids that are connected in long chains. There are 20 different kinds of amino acids that can be combined to create a protein. The amino acid sequence determines the unique three-dimensional structure of each protein along with its specific function. Amino acids are divided into essential and non-essential amino acids.

The 12 non-essential amino acids can be synthesised by an organism on its own, whereas an organism must have the eight essential amino acids supplied external sources – such as from their diet.

As opposed to fat and carbohydrates, our bodies do not store proteins in their original form, but rather in the form of muscle mass. As a result, we only have a limited protein reserve that can be accessed when we do not receive sufficient amounts (both of protein and carbohydrates). Moreover, this leads to a loss of muscle mass.

Proteins fulfil key functions in our bodies.

Developing and maintaining the body’s structure

Protein offers structure and support for cells. On a larger scale, they support muscle development and thus give our bodies shape, strength and allow them to move.

Transport and storage

Proteins bind and transport atoms and small molecules in cells and throughout the entire body.

Formation of antibodies

Proteins help us form antibodies. These bind certain foreign bodies such as viruses and bacteria in order to protect our bodies.

Formation of enzymes

Enzymes are responsible for carrying out nearly every chemical reaction that takes place in our cells. They also help with the formation of new molecules by reading the stored genetic information in our DNA.

Coordination of biological processes

Like certain hormones, some proteins transmit signals to coordinate biological processes between different cells, tissues and organs.

How much protein do I need every day?

Our body needs a certain amount of protein every day in order to function properly. In order to reach optimal health and fitness levels, we recommend having a specialist determine your individual protein needs.

Here are the general reference values per day:

  • Teenage boys and active adult men: 150 to 200 grams
  • Children ages two to six, adult women and seniors: 100 to 140 grams
  • Children age six and older, teenage girls, active adult women and most adult men: 120 to 170 grams
  • Muscle development in women and men: 1.3 to 1.5 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight